Hackers Arrested in Spain: Connected to Sony Attack

computer hacker steal passwordMembers of “Anonymous” hacking group were arrested in Spain today.  These individuals’ names have not been released.  They are partly responsible for attacks that targeted the Sony Playstation Store, BBVA bank, various utility companies and foreign government websites.

The arrests were made in Barcelona, Valencia and Alicante.  Though there is some relief in the arrests of these individuals, there remains to be little information on whether or not this will subsequently affect the DDOS attacks that are carried out by the very loosely knit organization.  Members of “Anonymous” are free to join without any known form of initiation, and are immediately committing attacks on various firms using codes and tactics readily available to them by popular hangouts.  These hangouts or online communities provide a space for hackers to trade code and other information with their criminal counterparts.

A DDOS attack is a Denial-of-Service attack.  These attacks have been very popular in most the of recent hacks that have been occurring in 2011.  Carrying out a DDOS is subject to penalty under law.  In Spain and other regions of Europe, it breaks the Computer Misuse Act of 1990, or laws similar to it.

The Technological Investigation Brigade, an arm of Spain’s national police deserves much credit for the stellar work they have done in capturing those responsible for the malicious attacks made on various firms worldwide.  The task had been and will continue to be a tedious one–having to combat time, millions of lines of weblogs, encrypted communications and complicated hacking techniques that help conceal “Anonymous” members identities and locations.  The process the police force has been utilizing to capture individuals needs to be replicated and stream-lined if there is any real intention of curbing such attacks from happening in the future.  Currently, the arrest of a handful of individuals hardly curtails the recruitment and organization of such attacks.

SOURCEwww.pcworld.com       

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